Wednesday, September 3rd, 2014

September Early Reviewers batch is live!

The September 2014 batch of Early Reviewer books is up! We’ve got 97 titles this month, with a grand total of 2,540 copies to give out.

If you haven’t already, sign up for Early Reviewers. If you’ve already signed up, please check your mailing/email address and make sure they’re correct.

» Then request away!

The deadline to request a copy is Monday, September 29th at 6pm Eastern.

Eligiblity: Publishers do things country-by-country. This month we have publishers who can send books to the US, Canada, the UK, Israel, Australia, France, Germany, and many more. Make sure to check the flags by each book to see if it can be sent to your country.

Thanks to all the publishers participating this month!

Taylor Trade Publishing Candlewick Press Chronicle Books
Prufrock Press Apex Publications Tundra Books
CarTech Books Ballantine Books Books to Go Now
Wild Flower Press Summertime Publications Inc Aspidistra Press
Firbolg Publishing Henry Holt and Company Akashic Books
Horrific Tales Publishing Random House Fitzhenry & Whiteside
Fog Ink Rara Avis Plume
Medallion Press Plough Publishing House Crown Publishing
ForeEdge University Press of New England Dartmouth College Press
Dragonwell Publishing Algonquin Books Human Kinetics
Galaxy Press Kurodahan Press BookViewCafe
Recorded Books Quirk Books Rockridge Press
JournalStone Palgrave Macmillan McFarland
Copper Bay Press First Life Publishing Secant Publishing
Prospect Park Books

Labels: early reviewers, LTER

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

September ReadaThing kicks off today!

It’s not too late to join in our extended weekend ReadaThing. All are welcome, and you don’t have to read for the full weekend: the goal is to have a few people from around the world reading at any given time during the ReadaThing.

This edition of ReadaThing will be kicking off at 12am (midnight) UTC on Friday, August 29th (that’s 8pm Eastern, Thursday August 28th), and will end at the same time on Tuesday—12am UTC, September 2nd (8pm Eastern, Monday, September 1st). You can see the full timeline here. This August/September ReadaThing also happens to coincide with the US’s Labor Day weekend, so, to our US readers, if you’re looking for an excuse to get some more reading in this weekend, here’s your chance!

Sign up

Head directly to the August-September 2014 ReadaThing Wiki to sign up, or check out the announcement thread for more general information. You don’t have to pick a time slot in advance in order to participate! There’s a special place for readers who don’t want to commit to a specific schedule to sign up.

What are you reading?

Whether you’d like to check out what your fellow ReadaThing-ers are reading, or to share your own ReadaThing picks, head over to the What will you be reading? thread to see what books are slated. Remember: anything goes! You can read whatever you want, wherever you want.

Get ready to read

Once the ReadaThing is underway, keep an eye out for the “August-September 2014 ReadaThing: Log Book” thread, where you can document your ReadaThing experiences. Take a peek at the Log Book thread from our last ReadaThing in April, for examples.

ETA: You can find the August-September ReadaThing Lobg Book here!

If you’ve never done ReadaThing before, you’re in good company—this is my first one. Give it a try, and stay tuned to the ReadaThing group for updates. Thanks to LT member LucindaLibri for organizing this ReadaThing!

Labels: readathon, reading, Uncategorized

Wednesday, August 20th, 2014

Q&A with Andy Weir

Some excerpts from our interview with author Andy Weir, which initially appeared in August’s State of the Thing.

Andy Weir has spent the bulk of his career up to this point as a software engineer. The success of his debut novel, The Martian has been the result of a remarkable journey, and is very much deserved. It’s little wonder that the author identifies as a “lifelong space nerd.”

Tim caught up with Andy this month to talk science, space, writing, and more science!

Tell us what your novel is all about.

It’s about an astronaut who gets stranded on Mars (the rest of his crew thought he was dead). Now he has to survive with the equipment he has on-hand.

The Martian has both a great narrative and an engrossing focus on scientific and practical specificities. What drove what?

Definitely the science drove the plot. The problems he faced were real issues someone in that situation would face, and his solutions had to solve them. So those problems, and their solutions, are what moved the plot along.

The science is real, right?

As best as I could make it, yes. I put a lot of effort into scientific accuracy. I did a ton of research and math to work everything out. I’m sure I made some mistakes, but for the most part, the science is solid.

I gather you even wrote an orbital mechanics program to figure out certain details in the novel. I have to ask, are you insane?

Haha, maybe. But I wanted everything to fit right. So I wanted to know how long it would take to get there with a constantly accelerating ship and what path they’d take.

As I said, before, it’s a page turner. Did you have any models for the narrative?

I didn’t really have any model, per se. The story is very linear. Each problem needs a solution, and usually the solution causes the next problem. All I had to do was have Mark narrate the situation with a smart-ass tone of voice.

The Martian had an unusual path to publication—free, then self-published and finally picked up by a major publisher. What does that tell us about your book, or about publishing in general?

It’s pretty cool. It means any schmoe can break into the writing world on their own. Self-publishing an electronic edition of your book costs you nothing, and if people like it, you’ll do well.

»For more from Andy, check out our full interview here.

Labels: author interview

Tuesday, August 12th, 2014

Job: Junior Social Media Specialist in Portland, ME

This could be you! (photo by bluesky1963)

LibraryThing is hiring a full-time Junior Social Media Specialist. We’re looking for someone who is bookish, local (Portland, ME area), and social media-savvy. You’d be working closely with Loranne, our Member Support and Social Media Librarian, here at LTHQ in Portland.

You must:

  • Live in or near Portland, ME
  • Love books
  • Love people, at least sometimes
  • Be familiar with social media, and bookish social media
  • Write and edit well and quickly
  • Work both independently and under direction
  • Be hard-working, organized, and detail-oriented enough to remember to title your job application email “[Name]: Job Application”
  • Be aware of What Makes LibraryThing LibraryThing

We’ll pick smarts, affability and drive over any skill. But our ideal candidate would have:

  • Book-world experience
  • Professional social media experience
  • Technical skills (HTML, CSS, SQL)
  • LibraryThing membership/familiarity

Your duties include:

  • Help members with problems via email, Talk and social media
  • Help write our monthly newsletters, blog posts, tweets, and Facebook posts
  • Help developers to develop and test new features and projects
  • Be an active presence on the site
  • Manage incoming/outgoing mail, and some general office management tasks

Compensation:

Experience-appropriate salary with gold-plated health and dental insurance. We require hard work, but we are flexible about hours, and–so long as you are in the area–where you work from.

How to apply:

Send your resume (in PDF format, please) to loranne@librarything.com. Your email should be your cover letter.

Fine Print:

Per our Privacy Policy, LibraryThing is an equal opportunity employer and will not discriminate against any employee or applicant on the basis of religion, race, color, national origin, ethnic origin, age, sex, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, pregnancy status, parental status, marital status, veteran status or any other classification protected by applicable federal, state, or local law.

Labels: employment, hiring, jobs

Tuesday, August 5th, 2014

August Early Reviewers batch is live!

The August 2014 batch of Early Reviewer books is up! We’ve got 122 titles this month, with a grand total of 3,186 copies to give out, including the latest from Cloud Atlas author David Mitchel—The Bone Clocks, a number of cookbooks, and Mallory Ortberg’s (of The Toast) Texts from Jane Eyre.

If you haven’t already, sign up for Early Reviewers. If you’ve already signed up, please check your mailing/email address and make sure they’re correct.

» Then request away!

The deadline to request a copy is Monday, August 25th at 6PM Eastern.

Eligiblity: Publishers do things country-by-country. This month we have publishers who can send books to the US, Canada, the UK, Israel, Australia, France, Germany, and many more. Make sure to check the flags by each book to see if it can be sent to your country.

Thanks to all the publishers participating this month!

Taylor Trade Publishing Lion Fiction Candlewick Press
Henry Holt and Company Gotham Books William Morrow
Chronicle Books In Fact Books Ballantine Books
Open Books Akashic Books Dragonfairy Press
Sakura Publishing Prufrock Press Bethany House
Beaufort Books Apex Publications MSI Press
Random House Crown Publishing Del Rey
EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy Publishing Five Rivers Publishing Cool Gus Publishing
Jupiter Gardens Press Tundra Books Bellevue Literary Press
Glagoslav Publications Ltd. Shasta Press Rockridge Press
Mendocino Press BookViewCafe Algonquin Books
Booktrope Greenleaf Book Group Quirk Books
Recorded Books Bantam Dell Thunder Lake Press
Gray & Company, Publishers PublicAffairs Stick Raven Press
Plume Vinspire Publishing, LLC JournalStone
Palgrave Macmillan

Labels: early reviewers, LTER

Monday, July 28th, 2014

Summer Reads 2014

Whether lounging on the beach, sipping icy beverages poolside, or retreating into the blissfully air-conditioned depths of the indoors, there’s something truly excellent about reading in the summertime. You have to do something with the extended daylight, anyway, right? I asked the rest of the LT staff to help me compile a list of our favorite summer reads for 2014. Check them out!

» List: Summer Reads 2014—Add your own here!


Tim

  1. The Martian by Andy Weir
  2. Chocky by John Wyndham
  3. Kindred by Octavia E. Butler
  4. My wife’s novel (drafts)
  5. Terrible science fiction. Why is so much of it so bad?

Abby

  1. The Book of Life by Deborah Harkness
  2. The Quick by Lauren Owen
  3. The Lost Sisterhood by Anne Fortier

Kate

  1. We Were Liars by E. Lockhart
  2. I Am Pilgrim by Terry Hayes
  3. Texts from Jane Eyre by Mallory Ortberg

Mike

  1. Words of Radiance by Brandon Sanderson
  2. Dangerous Women by George R. R. Martin
  3. Wild Mammals of New England by Alfred J. Godin

Chris C.

  1. A Room with a View by E. M. Forster
  2. Machine Learning with R by Brett Lantz
  3. Head First Statistics by Dawn Griffiths

KJ

  1. Cinnamon and Gunpowder by Eli Brown
  2. The United States vs Pvt. Chelsea Manning by Clark Stoeckly
  3. The Odyssey by Homer

Loranne

  1. Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie
  2. Soon I Will Be Invincible by Austin Grossman
  3. Robogenesis by Daniel H. Wilson

Jon

  1. Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis
  2. The Autobiography of Mark Twain, Vol. 2 by Mark Twain
  3. Transit by Anna Seghers

Kirsten

  1. The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin
  2. Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan
  3. Where’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple

Matt

  1. The Lion by Nelson Demille
  2. Transfer of Power by Vince Flynn
  3. 11/22/63 by Stephen King

Eddy

  1. Scorpia Rising by Anthony Horowitz
  2. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  3. Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

More?

What are your favorite summer reads? Add yours to our list, and join us on Talk!

Labels: lists, reading, recommendations

Friday, July 25th, 2014

Interview with Maximillian Potter

Some excerpts from our interview with Maximillian Potter, which initially appeared in July’s State of the Thing.

Maximillian Potter is the senior media advisor for the governor of Colorado. He is also an award-winning journalist, and the former executive editor of 5280: Denver’s Magazine. His first book, Shadows in the Vineyard, detailing the events surrounding an attempt to poison one of the world’s greatest wineries, is out this month.

We have 10 copies of Shadows in the Vineyard available through Early Reviewers this month. Go here to request one!

Loranne caught up with Maximillian this month to discuss the crime, the writing process, and, of course, wine.

For those who have yet to read Shadows in the Vineyard, could you give us the nutshell version of the book?

The narrative engine of the book is the story of an unprecedented crime that was committed against the most highly regarded and storied winery in the world, the Domaine de la Romanée-Conti. Located in the heart of France’s Burgundy region, the DRC (in wine-speak) produces seven of the world’s finest and—go figure—most expensive wines, including La Tâche, Richebourg, and arguably the most coveted wine on the planet, Romanée-Conti, which, in the unlikely event you could find it available for purchase, is likely selling for north of $10,000. The French government regards the DRC as something of a national landmark. Think of the winery as something akin to America’s Liberty Bell, only it produces wine.

In January 2010, the co-owner of the Domaine, Monsieur Aubert de Villaine, received a note informing him that a small piece of his winery’s most prestigious vineyard, Romanée-Conti, had been poisoned and most of the rest of the vines in that parcel would be killed unless De Villaine paid a one million euro ransom. A substantial part of the book deals with the criminal investigation, the investigators, the sting operation that caught the bad guys, and the unlikely and tragic end of the investigation. But the crime is only a piece of the book.

For the crime to be fully appreciated, the reader must understand Burgundy. So the criminal investigation becomes a way to explore the characters, culture and history of region. To go with a viticulture metaphor, I think of the crime as the main vine trunk and the subplots as the shoots of the vine. We come to know the incredible history of wine in Burgundy, which begins with bands of holy men on the run; then the Prince de Conti—the James Bond of pre-revolutionary France; and of course, the De Villaine family, which co-owns the Domaine, and the tensions that nearly pulled apart their winery and the disciplined tenderness that held it together.

Shadows is about about a crime, wine, family, obsession and love.

You first brought this story of wine, intrigue, and sabotage to the public in a Vanity Fair piece in 2011. What drew you to this particular story, so much that you decided to expand it into a book? What was the most challenging part of bringing the tale to life in a longer format?

I sensed there was a book to be written not long after I first arrived in Burgundy to report the Vanity Fair story. I’d been doing magazine stories for the better part of 20 years and this was one of the three times in all of that time when I’d felt that there was so much rich material it ached for a book. In this case, I first started thinking of a book during my very first meeting with Monsieur Aubert de Villaine. Before I’d met Aubert, in my mind’s eye, I pictured him as a soft-palmed, ascot-wearing French aristocrat who charged way too much for a bottle of wine and probably had whatever happened to his vines coming. Within hours of talking with him, I began to realize how ignorant my image of him had been.

While many vinegrowers, or vignerons, refer to their vines as their enfants, for Aubert, these vines were indeed his children. What’s more, they are his legacy, handed down through generations, and these vines are entangled with French history. The Domaine, as Monsieur de Villaine puts it, is something much bigger than any one person or vintage.

Even in the face of the attack on this sacred trust, his demeanor remained unwaveringly kind and gentle. When I learned of what he had decided to do, or rather not do, to the bad guys when they were apprehended, well, I was stunned by his mercy and forgiveness. Aubert once told me, “The world could use more hugs.” The world could use more people like Monsieur de Villaine. So meeting him was a moment.

Other factors that got me thinking a book that needed to be written were the remarkable history of the Burgundy region, the jealousies and intrigue interwoven throughout the the region and the history of the Domaine itself. When I discovered that the Prince de Conti—after whom the winery and its celebrated vineyard is named—may very well have almost trigged the French Revolution decades before it occurred, that struck me as irresistible.

The hardest thing about expanding what started as a magazine piece into the book format was having to leave so many stories and so many great characters out of the book. …Sigh.

The neat thing about Shadows—especially for wine novices like myself—is that you bring a large dose of historical context into the tale, showing us how the Domaine de la Romanée-Conti came to be, and developed into the revered vineyard it is. Was it difficult to strike a balance between providing that context and maintaining focus on the ongoing story?

Well, thanks and I’m glad you liked it. While I found myself with many options when it came to great characters and magnificent historical subplots, yes, it was difficult to find what I hope is a compelling structure that strikes the right balance of historical context and true crime. I wanted to satiate oenophiles, but also captivate wine novices.

For me, when it comes to writing, structure is close to everything—if that’s wrong, it’s all wrong. Perhaps giving myself too much credit, I consider myself a pretty average human, especially when it comes to curiosity and attention span; in determining the structure, I considered what it was about Burgundy that I had found so compelling and I went with that as my guiding strategy. As I began writing the book, I found myself saying to friends that the crime was what first drew me to Burgundy, but the poetry of the place was what kept me coming back. The thing was, once I was into reporting the crime, in Burgundy talking with Aubert and so many other Burgundians, I came to learn that, My gosh, the crime really is not the most interesting thing about this region and the people who cherish and cultivate it; there’s so much more. And so, I tried to structure the book accordingly.

Before all of this, I didn’t care much about wine, didn’t care much about France. I wouldn’t have been much interested in a book about either. (Happens a lot when you write for general interest magazines, by the way.) I certainly wasn’t one to pick up a book about wine. I wrote the book for people like me. Ultimately, I guess, I wrote the book primarily thinking of people who haven’t yet discovered wine but who should. I hope Shadows will be something that readers remember, the people and stories, and that those memories will enhance the flavor and enjoyment of their next glass of burgundy, or maybe inspire them to try their first burgundy.

What was the most interesting or surprising thing you learned as you researched for Shadows in the Vineyard?

Gosh, so much. In terms of reported material, the story of the Prince de Conti was the most stunning to me. Such a remarkable character. He personifies that old nonfiction writers truism that fact really can be stranger (and so much more awesome) than fiction.

On a more existential level, I was struck by the fact that everyone I met in Burgundy and who loved Burgundy, who worked in wine and believed in the magic of the terroir of the place—everyone of them was broken. In some way, each of these Burgundy believers was—is—broken, or maybe a better way of saying it has died a little at some point because of tragedy. (Who among us isn’t like that, I guess.) Yet, in Burgundy, they find the promise of starting over, of the rebirth, of the hope, that comes in every new vintage. Burgundians are aware of this. That’s pretty awesome. At least, I think so.

»For more from Maximillian, read our full interview here.

Labels: author interview

Friday, July 25th, 2014

Interview with Matthew Thomas

Some excerpts from our interview with author Matthew Thomas, which initially appeared in July’s State of the Thing.

Matthew Thomas‘s debut novel, We Are Not Ourselves, has been a decade in the making, and is set for release—at last—August 19th, 2014. The novel chronicles the life and stories of the Leary family, Irish-American immigrants making their way in New York City.

Matthew—born in the Bronx and raised in Queens—has spent the bulk of that decade as an English teacher at Xavier High School in New York City. He holds a B.A. from the University of Chicago, and studied with Alice McDermott at Johns Hopkins University. He and his wife currently live in New Jersey, with their twins.

We’ve got 25 copies of We Are Not Ourselves available through Early Reviewers this month. Go here to request one!

LibraryThing staffer KJ Gormley caught up with Matthew to discuss We Are Not Ourselves.

I could frame your book as everything from “immigrant story” to “big American Dream novel”: In your own words, can you briefly sum up what you think We Are Not Ourselves is about?

It’s the story of Eileen Tumulty growing up in post-World War II Queens as the only daughter of Irish immigrants and deciding from an early age that she wants a better life than the one she knows. The book chronicles her journey toward that life and the obstacles she encounters on the way, especially in her marriage to her beloved husband Ed Leary. The second half is the story of how Eileen and Ed handle adversity together.

I tried, through telling the story of this one family, to tell some of the story of the middle class in America—their hopes and fears, dreams and disappointments, and quiet achievements over the course of the twentieth century. I wanted to explore the enduring appeal of the American Dream and examine its viability in an environment that is squeezing out the middle class. In the end, I wanted to see what residual deposits might be left in the spirit when a person achieves that elusive dream at any cost.

The novel is told through the interchanging points of view of Eileen Leary and her son, Connell. Why did you choose these view-points and not that of Ed Leary, the husband and father in the family at the heart of the book?

I wanted the reader to feel palpably the absence of Ed’s point of view, and I hoped to provoke the reader to thought by leaving it out. In omitting such a focal character’s point of view, I wanted to capture some of the essence of Ed’s own isolating experience of dealing with the calamity that befalls him. There is a sense in which those on the other side of Alzheimer’s, even the closest of family members, find the experience of the sufferer inscrutable, almost ineffable. And from a dramatic perspective, I was interested in telling the story of how each of the people closest to Ed, including extended family and friends, responds to Ed’s disease in his or her own way. Ed became a fulcrum around which all the characters revolved, and his illness became a backdrop for a series of character studies and explorations into human nature. I tried to take my cues from the characters themselves in presenting a range of possible reactions that might capture the manifold ways people handle bad news.

The Leary family is composed of first-generation Irish-Americans and their son. Why did you choose this particular immigrant subculture rather than any other?

The Irish-American community is the one from which I emerged, so it was the one I could write about with the most immediate authority. I tried to capture some of the truth of the lived experience of a people in a particular place and time—a tribe, a dominant culture, a subculture, whatever you choose to call it—as best as I understood them. But one thing I found was that focusing on one culture offers the writer a prism through which to view many cultures. Even within this one culture, Irish-Americans in the New York area, there are countless subcultures.

The Irish who live in Rockaway are not the same as those who live in Long Beach, or on Staten Island, or in the Woodlawn section of the Bronx, or in Yonkers, or in Bronxville. And yet they share so many commonalities that they can reasonably be spoken of in the aggregate. I’m interested in the overlaps that lend universality to experiences, because there is something hopeful in thinking of universalities, and I’m also interested in the textures that make experiences distinct. Jackson Heights was a great backdrop for exploring both, as it gathers in one place people from every corner of the globe. On the other hand, I had no particular ambition to write an Irish-American novel, but was writing a novel, period, which happened to focus on Irish-American protagonists. I was thrilled to hear from a Greek reader that he’d seen his father in Big Mike, and from a Montenegran one that he’d seen his grandfather.

This book is refreshing in its frank discussions of money, at least in the character’s heads. Why do you think it was important to leave calculations of pensions and home equity loans in your novel?

I think it makes a book more realistic for there to be discussions of money in it—budgets, plans. This is the stuff of real life. It’s what the overwhelming majority of people have to deal with on a daily basis. Not to write about the routine details of people’s sometimes difficult financial circumstances is to avoid writing about a crucial aspect of everyday contemporary experience. And money is the last taboo in American life, so frank discussions of money, as long as they don’t delve into the most obscure minutiae and leave the reader behind, can create a frisson in the reader perhaps even more potent than the one created when a writer trains the lens on a character’s bedroom and intimate life.

What was your favorite scene to write?

My favorite scene to write was Eileen saying goodbye to Sergei, the live-in nurse she has gotten close to over the course of the book. It was a scene that unfolded for me in a relatively automatic way after all the work I’d put into constructing that arc of the story, and I just tried to race to get it down as it presented itself to me.

One of the underlying plots of Connell’s relationship to his father, Ed, is through their shared love of baseball. Why do you think baseball keeps turning up in books that are at some level about the American Dream?

I think part of why baseball has long been fodder for American fiction writers, apart from the novelistic feel of a season or the short story feel of an individual game, is that it does indeed bring people together in a common conversation. For years, baseball was a point of entry into American culture for immigrants who found they could share a language with established Americans in the joys and tribulations of fandom. And it was a primer for many males in the performance of the rituals of masculinity, beginning with stickball or little league or the catch with dad, and continuing, the idea went, into one’s relationship with one’s own child. Baseball fandom became a signifier of one’s willingness to assume certain ratified, prescribed male roles. And affections for teams were tribal, and epic in scope. If a girl’s father was a Yankees fan, then she was a Yankees fan. That bone-deep identification is fertile territory for fiction, because it activates the most basic impulse of storytelling. This is who I am—a Yankees fan.

»For more from Matthew, read our full interview here.

Labels: author interview

Tuesday, July 8th, 2014

July Early Reviewers batch is live!

The July 2014 batch of Early Reviewer books is up! We’ve got 120 titles this month, with a grand total of 3,747 copies to give out, ranging from the upcoming Jack Reacher novel, Personal, to a biography of Hatshepsut—the longest-reigning female ruler in Ancient Egypt.

If you haven’t already, make sure to sign up for Early Reviewers. If you’ve already signed up, please check your mailing/email address and make sure they’re correct.

» Then request away!

The deadline to request copies from the May batch is Monday, July 28th at 6pm Eastern.

Eligiblity: Publishers do things country-by-country. This month we have publishers who can send books to the US, Canada, the UK, Israel, Australia, France, Germany, and many more! Make sure to check the flags by each book to see if it can be sent to your country.

Thanks to all the publishers participating this month!

Santa Fe Writers Project Taylor Trade Publishing Riverhead Books
Putnam Books Lion Fiction Prufrock Press
Ballantine Books Bethany House Crown Publishing
Candlewick Press Cleis Press Mythos Press
Henry Holt and Company Quiller Press Great Lands Publishing, LLC
JournalStone Sakura Publishing Five Rivers Publishing
The Permanent Press Random House McFarland
Gotham Books Momentum Delacorte Press
Jupiter Gardens Press Books to Go Now Human Kinetics
Palgrave Macmillan Meadowbrook Press Recorded Books
Salinas Press Rockridge Press Calistoga Press
Eerdmans Books for Young Readers William Morrow Siena Moon Books
Open Books Demos Health Ghostwoods Books
BookViewCafe Booktrope Quirk Books
Bantam Dell Vinspire Publishing, LLC CarTech Books
Humanist Press Dartmouth College Press Algonquin Books
Plume By the Sea Books Publishing Company Gray & Company, Publishers
Raven Reads

Labels: early reviewers, LTER

Thursday, June 19th, 2014

Early Reviewers Bonus Batch from Hachette!

hachette_logos

Hachette, the publisher behind imprints like Little, Brown, Grand Central and Orbit, is participating in Early Reviewers in a big way this month—so much so that we decided to put together a “bonus batch” showcasing of all the great books available across their many imprints. All told, Hachette is offering 825 copies of 47 titles!

Note: For distribution-rights issues, we’re able to offer books in this showcase to US members alone. We hope to expand to all our members the next time we do a showcase like this.

The titles offered include Carlos Ruiz Zafón’s Marina, Megan Abbott’s The Fever, The Ice Cream Queen of Orchard Street by Susan Jane Gilman, Shadows in the Vineyard by Maximillian Potter(1), and a much-anticipated debut novel from NPR-contributor Brittani Sonnenberg, Home Leave. They’re repeating Ann Leckie’s Ancillary Justice, which just won the 2014 Nebula Award for Best Novel, and whose sequel we hope to get into Early Reviewers in a couple months.

Note: all Hachette Showcase Bonus Batch titles are listed separately from the regular June Early Reviewers batch. Members are eligible to win books from BOTH the June batch, and the Hachette Showcase Bonus Batch.

You can see the full list of titles in the Hachette Showcase here. To request a copy:

First, make sure to sign up for Early Reviewers. If you’ve already signed up, please check your email/mailing address and make sure it’s correct.

» Then request away!

The deadline to request a copy is Tuesday, July 1st at 6pm Eastern.

Questions or comments about the Hachette Showcase? Come tell me what you think on Talk.

I’d like to give a huge “Thank you!” to everyone at Hachette who helped me coordinate this bonus batch!


Small print: Winning a book from either the Hachette Showcase or the regular June Early Reviewers batch will not affect your chances of winning a book from the other. You may end up with multiple wins! If you’ve already made your requests for the June batch, but would prefer to win titles from the Hachette Showcase instead, you can unrequest titles by going to the appropriate Early Reviewers list, selecting the batch you’d like to view from the drop-down menu, and clicking “Unrequest” next to any books you’ve already requested.

1. Full disclosure: Potter’s literary agent is a friend of Tim’s.

Labels: bonus batch, early reviewers